Utmost Respect: Tigress who gave birth to 29 cubs, given grand funeral

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Forest Department, MP

Funeral processions or the last rites of deceased human beings are nothing out of ordinary, these rituals go way, way back into the human history, being as old as whole our culture itself, a rather remarkably fascinating fact is the funeral as we know it; mourning, remembrance and burial, has been observed within different species of animal kingdom too, i.e. crows, elephants, primates and dolphins (minus the remembrance part of course unless we know what’s going on in their minds). So, different species offer final rites of their own. But have you heard one species type arranging a funeral for another? And by funeral, we do not mean your average 2-3 attendees pet burial but a massive scale one, attended by the dignitaries of city and many more.


Forest Department, MP

Well, if you have not, today you’re in luck (unlike the poor creature who just passed, thoughts and prayers for it). In India, the department of forest, Madhya Pradesh state organised a proper, grand funeral for their prized Royal Bengal tigress, who had been named ‘Collarwali’, famous nationwide for giving birth to 29 cubs & playing a key role in stabilising declining Indian tiger population, she was conferred upon the title of “Supermom” for that invaluable contribution. Collarwali expired at the ripe old age of 16, substantially going past the average lifespan (8 to 10 years) of her kind. Even Madhya Pradesh’s Chief Minister paid his heartfelt homage to marvellous creature, saying the queen of Pench Tiger Reserve has become immortalised because her cubs shall always be roaring in jungles of state.


Forest Department, MP

On being cremated to eternal peace, tigress was swathed in a white cloth, covered over by flower garlands and rose petals atop the wooden pile of pyre. Noteworthy wildlife & government officials were in presence at occasion, bidding ultimate adieus to their benefactress.

This compels me to utter the overly used, the biggest offender of clichéd uplifting/inspirational phrases: “Faith in humanity restored”, so I would resist the urge (majorly because faith surely has not been restored! Humanity is the reason tigers are in World Wildlife Fund endangered animals’ red list) and just say instead, “No good deed is ever forgotten, although at certain times you may think so, but someplace somewhere, there is always gonna be someone thankful, someone indebted, someone appreciative for what you did for them”.


Forest Department, MP